When a Manhattan’s $90 Per Night AirBnb is a NYCHA Apartment

The old adage remains true, if it’s too good to be true, it probably is

Renting a Manhattan Airbnb unit in Manhattan for $90 per night would make anyone excited for a New York excursion.

A delightful trip for a pair of Boston visitors turned into a trip they weren’t expecting.

The listing boasted close proximity to the High Line and Chelsea Market, making the price all too enticing.

However upon arrival, the mother and daughter found themselves on the 7th floor of a NYCHA Development at Fulton Houses.

They didn’t anticipate the accommodations encountered.

Obviously, the roach trap near the bed or any of the shady accommodations didn’t appear in the advertisement.

The pair googled the acronym NYCHA posted in the lobby and realized the deception.  Airbnb removed the post when alerted by the pair.

Is this a one time occurrence?

Apparently not. A listing was recently reported in the Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City.

The listing had a 4.2 star rating with good reviews.

In fact, one stated “Airbnb was clean and very big for 3 people.”

When inquired if illegal subletting is rampant in NYCHA buildings, a NYCHA spokesperson indicated it isn’t “widespread”.

Why can’t tenants list their apartment as Airbnb?

NYCHA released a statement indicating illegal subletting of NYCHA apartments on Airbnb is prohibited by HUD regulations and by lease agreements.

Section 8 or rent controlled subsidized housing can not sublet their apartments.

The news caught the attention of a city official that prompted him to suggest congressional hearings into how rampant the abuse is.

It’s clear, reading reviews and star ratings on Airbnb won’t guarantee you a great stay.

Also in this edition of Talking Stoops

  • NYCHA Fulton Houses to be developed into mixed-income apartments [read here]
  • Council hearings on NYCHA Airbnb listings [read here]
  • Could you live here in Crown Heights and gain work/life balance [find out more here]
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